Tagged: ESPN

Congrats To Giants, The 2010 World Series Champions

 

Everywhere you looook!

The San Francisco Giants are World Series Champions for the first time since 1954. I wonder if that means Danny Tanner, Jesse Katsopolis, and Joey Gladstone will be attending the victory parade…

I am just kidding about the second part, of course. But in all seriousness, hats off to the G-Men on a well-played 2010 World Series. They had everything go right for them; solid pitching, stellar defense, and incredible offense.

Congrats to the Giants

Last summer ESPN’s Baseball Tonight program hosted their “Chatter Up” segment, a part of the show in which viewers can submit their ideas and thoughts about a subject chosen by the panel. ESPN picks the best comments sent in, puts them on TV, and the analysts discuss them. The topic in question was, “Which team in the National League, currently not in first place, do you think has the best chance of making the postseason?”

My comment was, “I think it’s the Giants, because Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, and Jonathan Sanchez remind me of Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and John Smoltz.”

As I was watching the program, to my surprise, my name and comment showed up on ESPN.

Steve Berthiaume, the panel moderator, said, “OK, I get the Greg Maddux-Tim Lincecum thing; I’m with him on Matt Cain-Tom Glavine…but I’m a little lost on John Smoltz-Jonathan Sanchez. I don’t think…But that’s OK…”

Thanks for featuring me ESPN. Told you the Giants were good, Buster Olney!!!!

My sports writing inspiration and BBTN panelist Buster Olney then said, “A.J., I’m not sure about Sanchez. He’s not quite at the level yet, but good idea.”

I had only mentioned Sanchez in comparison to Smoltz because..well…they are both pitchers who started in the bullpen and became starters. Plus, Sanchez had already thrown a no-hitter, which I feel made him worthy of the mention.

The point is, even last year I knew the Giants were good. It was only a matter of time before they put it all together.

In a lot of ways the Giants had exactly what the 1996 Yankees had; that’s the team I thought of when I looked at them. When Madison Bumgarner tossed a shutout in Game Four, it reminded me of the same way Andy Pettitte battled in ’96.

Brian Wilson was a stud shutting down Texas, the same way John Wetteland mowed down Atlanta.

The Giants had the right mixture of talented rookies–players like Lincecum, Cain, Bumgarner, and Buster Posey–and chiseled, championship-tested veterans, like Edgar Renteria, Juan Uribe, Aaron Rowand, and Pat Burrell–all of whom have already played in (and won, no less) at least one World Series prior to 2010.

Celebrate good times.

Renteria was a great choice for World Series MVP, as he has come a long way in his career. He became only the fourth player in MLB history to knock in the game-winning run in two World Series clinching games. In 1997, Renteria knocked in the go-ahead run for the Florida Marlins in their clinching game, and of course his three-run homer won the game for the Giants last night.

With that, Renteria joined legendary Yankees Yogi Berra, Lou Gehrig, and Joe DiMaggio on the list of players who have knocked in game-winning runs in the clinching game of a World Series twice in their careers. The veteran Giant journeyman is certainly in great company.

What I also liked about the Giants winning was the fact that since 2005, the World Series Champions have alternated from league to league. Meaning:

·         2005 Chicago White Sox (A.L.)

·         2006 St. Louis Cardinals (N.L.)

·         2007 Boston Red Sox (A.L.)

·         2008 Philadelphia Phillies (N.L.)

·         2009 New York Yankees (A.L.)

·         2010 San Francisco Giants (N.L.)

It makes it more interesting because one league has not been dominating for a number of years; it’s been a back-and-forth battle for the past six years and I hope it continues this way for the next few seasons.

It's gone back-and-forth for six years running

As for the Texas Rangers? Well, they were an excellent team this season. They just seemed to have run out of gas. We found out Cliff Lee is not Jesus Christ and is a human being after all. In Game One of the fall classic, Lee only tossed 4 2/3 innings and gave up seven runs on eight hits. On the bright side the invincible Lee demonstrated his solid control and only walked one batter and struck out seven, but unfortunately it was a losing effort.

In the decisive Game Five Lee had it going right until the seventh, when he gave up a three-run home run to Renteria. As we saw in Game Four of the ALCS–A.J. Burnett’s home run to Bengie Molina–even when you are throwing a good game, one pitch can cost you the game; one bad inning can kill you.

Lee was just not the same guy in the seventh inning last night. And now, for the second year in a row, he has been on the losing World Series team. However, it does not mean he has pitched poorly in the World Series; the only forgettable game for him was Game One this year.

And of course most Yankee fans remember how incredible he was in 2009 for Philadelphia.

2011 Yankee?????

That being said, will Lee be in pinstripes next year? Right now, who’s to say? Lee has already said he would like to stay in Texas, but if the Yanks make him the right offer, there’s no telling where he will decide to go.

It’s going to be a long off-season and the Yankees already have other deals to make first, namely re-acquiring Derek Jeter who just filed for free agency. Signing back Mariano Rivera is also at the top of the Yanks’ to-do list and they also have to make Pettitte a deal, should he choose to play next season.

Yet, Yankees’ General Manager Brian Cashman has already said that another frontline starter and left-handed relief will be the focal point of this off-season. That only adds to my belief that they will indeed make a strong push for Lee when the winter meetings begin next month.

But that’s another story for another day. Today is the Giants’ day. And they deserve to be called World Series Champs in 2010. Once again, congratulations from Yankee Yapping to the fans in San Francisco and the Giants on a great season and a World Title.

I know that somewhere out in the bay area, there’s a Giants fan feeling the same way I did last year. And in 2000. And 1999. And 1998. And 1996…


Congrats once again, guys.

End of the Year Awards

 

Time to hand out some awards!

As the end of the 2010 regular Major League Baseball season rapidly approaches, the Yankees once again have lived to play autumn baseball in New York. At the very least, the Bronx Bombers will go into the postseason as the American League Wild Card team. Yet they can still capture the American League Eastern Division over the Tampa Bay Rays.

At press time they are a ½ game out of first place in the AL East.

With only three games left after tonight’s 8-3 loss vs. the Toronto Blue Jays, it is once again time to hand out the Yankee Yapping End of the Year Awards. Last year I gave out various commendations to numerous Yankees who showed what being a Bronx Bomber is all about.

Since 2010 was a stark contrast to 2009, there are new awards this year to accommodate what each player has done or accomplished this past season. Without any further ado, here are the 2010 Yankee Yapping Awards!

 

Yankee Yapping Most Valuable Player

Winner: Robinson Cano

 

Most Valuable Cano

The Yankees are very lucky to have a player like Robinson Cano. This season, the slugging second baseman has put together an MVP caliber season with 28 home runs and 106 RBIs to this point. His numbers indicate a great year, but he did not win the YY MVP simply because of his offensive production.

His defense and overall character put him over the top.

In 155 games at second base this season (talk about durability!) Cano has only committed three errors. He has also helped turn 111 double plays and has secured a fielding percentage of .996.

Can you say Gold Glove?

Cano has also had the most consistent season among all Yankee hitters. Derek Jeter is currently hitting under .300, Mark Teixeira got off to a tortoise-like start, and Alex Rodriguez spent time on the disabled list. Cano did not slip under .300 this year, nor did he start off slow or get injured.

His season has all the makings of a valuable player.

Congrats Robinson!

 

Yankee Yapping’s Most Pleasant Surprise

Winner: Marcus Thames

Thames did well. I gotta hand it to him.

I’ll be the first to admit that when the Yankees let Johnny Damon go…or he let himself go…that I thought picking up Marcus Thames was a bad idea. He had already been a Yankee in 2002, although he was not what we would call a real Yankee.

Everyone knows that, in his first stint in pinstripes, Thames clubbed his first career home run in his first career at-bat off brand-name future Hall of Famer Randy Johnson. What most people don’t know is that home run was the only long ball Thames hit in his first go-round with the Yankees and he only played seven games.

2010 was his second chance and he certainly took advantage of it.

To go along with his batting average of .291, Thames has smacked 12 home runs this year and has driven in 33 runs. Two of his homers this season stand out to me.

First off, his third home run of the year, which came on July 11–only because of who he hit it off: Brian Sweeney of the Seattle Mariners.

As almost everyone knows by now, I interviewed Sweeney over the summer and he is a graduate of my College. That home run was bittersweet for me. I was happy to see Thames get around on a hanging curveball and smash a homer, but at the same time I felt bad for Sweeney.

Being such a nice guy and, without any sarcasm, the best interview I have ever conducted, I had no choice but to feel remorseful for my fellow Mercy alumnus. But Thames did a fantastic job of clubbing the ball!

The second home run that sticks out was his walk-off blast against Jonathan Papelbon and the Boston Red Sox on May 17. After A-Rod tied the game with one swing of the bat, Thames played the role of hero and swatted Papelbon to a loss.

A glorious home run to cap off a glorious victory over Boston in the Bronx.

I may have said some harsh things about him at the beginning of the year when he struggled, but he has proved me wrong. Congrats Marcus!

 

Yankee Yapping Player Who Needs to Improve for 2011

Winner: A.J. Burnett

I love you, buddy.

He had a terrible season. I know. All of Yankee Universe knows. The whole world knows.

A.J. Burnett has one more start this season (on Saturday in Boston) and will finish 2010 under .500. He is currently 10-15 with an earned run average of 5.33. In his last 10 games Burnett is 1-6 with an ERA of 6.26. Opponents are hitting .286 against him and he has allowed 107 earned runs this season.

If that doesn’t scream the words “off-year” I really don’t know what does.

Many Yankee fans are skeptical about how he will perform in the postseason and would not trust Burnett with the ball in an important game. Yankee Universe also feels he should be bumped from the number two spot in the starting rotation; some are even going as far as saying he should be put in the bullpen.

I agree. He should be bumped from the number two spot and I doubt that he will be plugged into any spot in the starting rotation, at least for the American League Division Series. If he goes to the bullpen, he might be able to carve a niche for himself, the same way Phil Hughes did last year in relief.

Although Burnett had an abysmal year, the one thing I will not do is give up on him. I understand how poorly he produced over the summer, but something many fans forget is that he began the year at 4-0 with an ERA under three. He got off to the best start of his career only to have it collapse on him; the most successful start of his life tragically morphed into the worst season he has ever had.

The other day I was asked if the Yankees would trade Burnett over the off-season because of his poor season.

The answer is easy: No. Here are three reasons Burnett is staying in pinstripes.

1)      His salary. He is owed $49.5 million over the next three years. Give me the name of a team who is going to pick up that tab? Oh, that’s right. You can’t.

 

2)       His trade value. With his lopsided numbers, who would want him?

 

3)      The Yankees’ faith in their big free agent pitchers. Anyone remember Carl Pavano? He was owed less money than Burnett, pitched worse than Burnett, and the Yankees held onto him without even trying to shop him.

 

It’s no contest. Burnett will be in pinstripes for awhile.

And while he is in pinstripes, he needs to learn how to handle himself, go out and win games. I have seen how physically capable Burnett is really is when he is pitching. He can throw 96-98 mph fastballs, something not even Mike Mussina could pull off in 2008, the year he won 20 games.

I think it’s all mental when it comes to Burnett’s struggles. Perhaps he should consult the team psychiatrist. Wait, is there a team psychiatrist?

At any rate, it’s a not a particularly good award to win, A.J. But I still have faith that you can improve, bounce back, have a solid postseason like last year and return strong in 2011.

I still believe in you, A.J. We A.J.s have to stick together through thick and thin.

 

Yankee Yapping Sayonara Award

Winners: Javier Vazquez and Nick Johnson


TERRIBLE. 

First of all, allow me to explain the nature of this award. I am handing out this award to two players who the Yankees signed, are not under contract for next season, and are most likely not coming back next year.

I had no choice but to give it Javier Vazquez and Nick Johnson.

When the Yankees decided to acquire Vazquez during the off-season, I was unbelievably confused. With a somewhat failed season in pinstripes already under his belt (2004) it shocked me that the Yanks went out and traded Melky Cabrera for Vazquez during the winter meetings.

This season just proved to me that Vazquez is not and never was suited for pinstripes. The reason the Yanks wanted him was because of how well he pitched last season, but what they did not take into consideration was that he pitched in the National League.

Vazquez made the move from the NL to the AL, and not just the AL–the AL East, where the best of the best play. And when he made that move, he traveled to a 10-10 record this year with an ERA over five.

That’s enough to say, “Thanks, but no thanks. See ya, Javy.”

Now onto Johnson…

Talk about a waste of money and time. I think his uncle, Larry Bowa, should chastise him for being such a mediocre and otherwise useless ballplayer. The Yanks signed Johnson to be an everyday designated hitter and replace Hideki Matsui in the lineup.

His numbers: 24 games played, two home runs, eight RBIs, and a .167 batting average.

…………………….

Sorry, I had to run to my bathroom and puke.

Both Vazquez and Johnson are no longer under contract for 2011. Thank God.

Congrats on the award, fellas. Have fun on another team next season!

 

Yankee Yapping Ace of the Year

Winner: CC Sabathia

Big Bad CC does it again.

When all the dust had cleared at the end of 2009, CC Sabathia had 22 wins, including the postseason. The postseason has not even begun this year and the Yankees’ number one man has 21 wins. With that, he became the first Yankee to win 21 games in the regular season since Andy Pettitte, who accomplished the feat in 1996.

 If the regular season is any indication of how Sabathia will perform in October, the Yankees will be in excellent shape every time he toes the rubber. Just as Burnett has had the worst season of his career, Sabathia has statistically had the best season he has ever had.

Needless to say, he is a shoe in for the Cy Young Award. CC might very well be “Cy Cy.”

Sabathia logged 237 2/3 innings this year, coupled with 197 strikeouts. He made 34 starts, tossed two complete games, and opponents only hit .239 against him.

If all goes right for him again, he could capture another postseason MVP award, as he was the American League Championship Series MVP in 2009. Either way, I have no doubt that Sabathia will have more hardware in his trophy case very soon.

Until then he is the Yankee Yapping Ace of the Year. Congrats CC!

*Note: CC has won this award for the second year in a row!

 

Yankee Yapping Best Trade Deadline Pickup

Winner: Kerry Wood


Wood was a great pickup.   

When the trade deadline neared the end, the Yankees picked up three notable players: Lance Berkman, Austin Kearns, and Kerry Wood. Without a doubt, Wood has made the best impact of all three players.

Wood was the Cleveland Indians’ closer and the Yankees needed to add a reliever to aid their scuffling bullpen. Suffice it to say, they added the right man. Wood has posted a low ERA in pinstripes and has really become a solid arm in relief.

Throughout his career, Wood has taken a lot of criticism because of his injuries; I am sure the Yankees knew about that when they traded for him. However, he was a former National League Rookie of the Year (1998, with the Chicago Cubs) and certainly possessed the capability to change the atmosphere of the bullpen.

It’s almost as if when Wood arrived, things started to turn around for them.

I remember his first outing as a Yankee against the Tampa Bay Rays. When Wood tossed that knee-buckling breaking ball and caught Evan Longoria looking like a deer in headlights, I knew right then and there he would fit in right away.

And he has.

Looking at his last 10 appearances alone is proof of that: 10 innings, no runs, four hits, five walks, 12 strikeouts, and an ERA of 0.00. He has flourished in his role as a late-inning relief pitcher and if he keeps it moving, he will be a wonderful asset when the playoffs begin.

Congrats Kerry!

 

Yankee Yapping Reliever of the Year

Winner: David Robertson

David Robertson battled back & earned it.

I know what everyone is thinking: how in the world could I have not awarded this honor to Mariano Rivera?! I would just like to say that The Great Rivera is his own “Walking Award,” so-to-speak. Rivera won it last year and he followed that up with another Mo-like season.

32 saves and a puny 1.32 ERA. Typical Mo.

But I am giving it to David Robertson simply because of how far he has come this year. At the outset of the season, Robertson could not get anyone out. He was placed in easy-going situations and lost control of everything.

Case-in-point: Opening Day vs. the Los Angeles Angels.

Robertson came into the game in a situation where there was absolutely no pressure; the Yankees were ahead 7-1 in the top of the ninth inning and he allowed that pressure get to him. He wound up surrendering a grand slam to Bobby Abreu and he nearly gave up the game because of it.

Yet, what struck me was what he said the day after it happened. I remember reading in the news the next day that he grabbed his glove before the game and had two words:

“New day.”

That’s precisely the attitude that won him this award. Well, that and his 67 strikeouts in 59 2/3 innings pitched this season. He never gave up, battled back from defeat, and is a solid and trustworthy arm out of the bullpen.

He deserves the honor. Congrats David!

 

Yankee Yapping Warrior Award

Winner: Mark Teixeira

Tex is a warrior.

As I mentioned before, Mark Teixeira began the season awfully slow. He was singled out on ESPN and every other sports media outlet about how he was not producing along with being criticized for his low batting average and meager power numbers.

But by around June it all changed and the sleeping giant woke up.

The power-hitting first baseman flipped the “on switch” and quickly became the dangerous hitter he has always been. Teixeira will finish 2010 with over 30 home runs and 100 RBIs for his second straight year in pinstripes.

He has 33 home runs and 107 RBIs at press time.

The reason he is regarded as a warrior is because he has been playing for a number of days, possibly even weeks, with a broken toe. Despite a relatively painful injury, he managed to keep himself in the lineup and at first base every day.  

Obviously playing in pain, Teixeira maintained his season and never let it affect him; Paul O’Neill, revered as the consummate “Yankee Warrior,” would certainly be proud of him.

Congrats Tex!

 

Yankee Yapping Grand Slam Champion

Winner: Alex Rodriguez

Grand Slam Man: A-Rod.

Whip out the mustard and rye: it’s grand salami!

Not once. Not twice. But three times this season Alex Rodriguez has delivered with the bases loaded. The former three-time AL MVP clobbered three grand slams this season, which accounts for 3/10 of the Yankees’ grand slams this year.

In fact, the Yankees tied their single season record for grand slams, originally set in 1987–Don Mattingly led the Yanks that year with six grannies out of their 10.

On May 14, Rodriguez visited granny for the first time this season. Minnesota Twins reliever intentionally walked Teixeira to pitch to Rodriguez–a strategy that never seems to pay off, according to the numbers. The Yankee third baseman responded by crushing a go-ahead grand slam over the left field wall to give the Yanks a 7-4 edge.

They went on to win 8-4.

On May 31, merely 17 days after the slam vs. the Twins, A-Rod stepped up to the plate against the Indians. With a full count, Rodriguez smashed a bomb into Monument Park, a glorious grand slam home run to give the Yanks a 6-1 lead over the Tribe.

Once again the Bombers cruised to a victory, 11-2 over Cleveland.

Rodriguez struck one last slam on July 6 in Oakland vs. the Athletics. A-Rod helped slam the Yanks to a 6-1 win. He came up in the top of the third and blasted a grand slam off Trevor Cahill, driving in four out of the Yankees’ five runs that inning.

In addition to his slam, Rodriguez later came up in the sixth and hit a solo homer, as he knocked in five of the Yanks’ six runs by himself.

A-Rod’s excellence and ability to come through when the bases are loaded earned him this award. Hopefully he can continue to rake when the postseason starts.

Congrats Alex!

 

Well that does it for this year. Either way it goes, the Yankees have an opportunity to repeat as World Champs. While whether they win it all or not remains to be seen, it’s clear these standout players made a difference in New York this season.

Congrats to all the Yankee Yapping Award winners and to all of the Yankees.

We’ll see you in October. Good luck!

As Trade Deadline Looms, Rodriguez Pushes For 600

 

 

Trade deadline is tomorrow...A-Rod is pushing for 600 homers.

As the Major League Baseball non-waivers trade deadline rapidly approaches–tomorrow afternoon at 4:00–Alex Rodriguez continues his chase for 600 home runs.

 

The Yankees did not panic when Andy Pettitte hurt his groin and went to the disabled list. They first allowed Sergio Mitre to take Pettitte’s place in the rotation, a move that did not pay off. On July 24 Mitre lost to the Kansas City Royals, tossing 4 1/3 innings and giving up five earned runs on seven hits.

 

Manager Joe Girardi said Mitre “wasn’t stretched out enough to be starting.”

 

Yesterday Dustin Moseley took the ball for Pettitte and put on quite a performance. The 28 year-old right hander pitched six innings of solid ball. He gave up one run and scattered four hits while walking two batters and striking out four. For his effort he earned himself a win over the Cleveland Indians.

 

Dustin Moseley pitched for Pettitte yesterday night 

 

Not bad for a spot start. I think he earned himself another start on Tuesday vs. Toronto.

 

In a blog post last week I said the Yankees need another arm, but if Moseley can handle the load and pitch the way he did last night, the Yanks may not need one. I suggested Dan Haren, but he has already been traded to the Los Angeles Angels. (He’s also already injured, as he was hit on the right forearm with a comeback line drive, but that’s another story for another time)

 

It doesn’t seem as if the Yankees are interested in Brian Bannister, the second hurler I pointed out as a possible target for the Bronx Bombers. Bannister was beaten by the Yankees on July 23, a game in which he only pitched 4 2/3 innings. He was touched up for four earned runs on six hits; he walked two batters and struck out five.

 

 


Brian Bannister (I guess) won't be joining the Yanks 

His season record fell to 7-9, but I still think he has potential. If he was on a team that gave him more run support (like the Yankees) I have a feeling his numbers would be a lot better.

 

It doesn’t look as though the Yankees are seeking any pitching help. I am however hearing a lot of yapping about “adding another bat” and the name that keeps popping up is Adam Dunn, the Washington Nationals’ first baseman. He would be a good addition to the team. Being a power-hitting lefty, Dunn could certainly use the short porch in Yankee Stadium to his advantage.

 

According to Buster Olney of ESPN, the two teams that are interested in Dunn are the Yankees and their opponent for this weekend, the Tampa Bay Rays. Olney said that each team is trying to make sure the other team doesn’t land Dunn, as they are in a heated race for the American League Eastern Division.

 

This morning, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reported that the Yankees “are not out on Dunn, that they may be using negotiation tactics to try and get him, and to not count them out on any player.”

 

 


Adam Dunn to the Yanks? 

Will he be traded to New York before tomorrow afternoon at 4:00? At the moment, nothing is etched in stone. It could happen and I would like to see it happen, but if it doesn’t, then it’s not a huge blow to the Yankees. The Bronx Bombers still have the best record in the majors without Dunn; getting him can only help and not getting him can’t hurt.

 

So do the Yankees really need to make a huge trade at all?

 

Well….any sort of minor trade can also help them. Consider last year’s trade for Jerry Hairston, Jr. Was he the best hitter on the team? No. Was he a Gold-Glove caliber fielder? Probably not. But did he do little things to help the team win and make a difference when it mattered?

 

 


Jerry Hairston scored the winning run in Game Two of the '09 ALCS 

Absolutely. He had that utility quality about himself, and he was a good pickup right before the deadline last year. After all, he did score the winning run in Game Two of the American League Championship Series. And as I understand, he is having a decent season over in San Diego for the N.L. West-leading Padres.

 

Even if the Yanks make a small trade a la the Hairston swap last year, it could make a world of difference come October.

 

As for A-Rod…

 

The Yankees’ third baseman clubbed his 599th career home run on Thursday July 22 vs. Kansas City. After a week, he has failed to put one in the seats and join the exclusive 600 Club–a club only Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth, Willy Mays, Ken Griffey, Jr., and Sammy Sosa are currently members of.

 

 


A-Rod is going for 600 this weekend 

Rodriguez was 4-for-21 in the last four games vs. Cleveland and overall is 9-for-30 since smacking number 599 last Thursday. He has gone 34 plate appearances without a round-tripper and seems to be pressing just a little bit.

 

It’s almost as if he is going through the same thing he went through in 2007 before reaching 500 home runs. Rodriguez had to wait eight days and 28 at-bats to belt number 500, so he certainly knows how it feels.

 

If he were to reach 600 homers this weekend, it wouldn’t be the first time Rodriguez has hit a meaningful home run at Tropicana Field. On Oct. 4 of last season, Rodriguez clobbered two home runs in the same inning, one of which was hit off tonight’s starter Wade Davis. The other homer was a grand slam to give him 30 home runs and 100 RBIs for the year.

 


Will 600 happen at Tropicana Field?    

 

Talk about a hitting show.

 

This season, Rodriguez has not left the yard at Tropicana Field, but is hitting .417 with three RBIs and three runs scored. Obviously his chances to hit 600 are good this weekend, so long as he doesn’t press and maintains an easy, fluid swing.

 

I noticed last night when Jess Todd struck him out swinging in the eighth inning, A-Rod looked like he wanted to hit a 15-run home run. He swung too early and he looks like he is trying too hard. If he eases up and stops pushing (which he is fully capable of doing) he will reach the milestone and get it over with.

 

Once again, all eyes on A-Rod this weekend.

 

 


All eyes on Alex Rodriguez as he goes for 600 home runs 

 

I’d like to take the time and thank MLBlogs for featuring Yankee Yapping on their main page! I came across this and enjoyed the little write-up they did on me.

 

 


On the main page of MLBlogs! 

This was very cool and I do hope to write for MLB.com sometime in the NEAR future!

 

Just to clarify something, however; I just graduated from Mercy College and there will only be one more story I am submitting to my school’s newspaper–that would be a story on Brian Sweeney, who pitched for Mercy when he attended the school.

 

I am taking my interview, which I conducted here on MLBlogs, and turning it into a feature article for the school paper. Even though I graduated, I am still going to use it for a clip to put into my portfolio. That will be my last article as Sports Editor.

 

Once again, thanks MLB.com for the write-up and the exposure. I hope to be working for you very soon!!! 😉

Rodriguez Made the Moment, Thames the Hero

Talk about a roller coaster ride.

 

On Monday night, the New York Yankees beat the Boston Red Sox 11-9 in what was probably the most heated game this season.

 

The Bronx Bombers have adopted the policy of kicking the Red Sox when they are down.

 

A lot of wild plays and standout performers in this one…

 

Marcus Thames

 

 


thames-mills-yanksjpg-acb4dd46419d1270_large.jpg 

Bottom of the ninth. Tie game, 9-9. One on, two out. Jonathan Papelbon vs. Marcus Thames. In my mind, we were heading for extra innings.

 

Papelbon left a floater right over the plate for Thames to crush, a moon shot into the left field stands to send the Yankees home with smiles on their faces.

 

That…was a BOMB! No extra innings tonight, just a pie to the face, courtesy of A.J. Burnett

 

Heading into that at-bat, Thames was 1-for-4 on the night with two RBIs and a strikeout. I will admit, when he struck out in the bottom of the eighth and the Yanks were down 9-7, I doubted him.

 

“Add Thames to the list of terrible signings this past off-season, along with Nick Johnson Randy Winn, and Chan Ho Park.”

 

So Thames had a good night. I cannot bash him at press time. I’m still not saying he was the best pickup this off-season, but he had his moment tonight. Tonight is the night he “earned back his pinstripes,” if you will.

 

But back to my point.

 

Everyone can keep tonight in their minds the next time he struggles. I mean, has everyone forgotten how poorly he played in Boston on May 9? He looked like giraffe in left field, he could not chase the ball down, and he didn’t hit.

 

On that night, no one wanted to be within 10 feet of him.

 

Yet when he succeeds, everyone worships him, as is the nature of the game and the fans.

 

Thames is currently hitting .365 with two home runs and 10 RBIs. Will he keep it up?

 

Perhaps. Perhaps not.

 

Just remember tonight next time he doesn’t come up big.

 

 

Alex Rodriguez

 

 


A-Rod tied the game in the ninth w/ a 2R HR 

Thames was the hero, but Alex Rodriguez afforded him the opportunity.

 

Down 9-7 in the bottom of the ninth with one out, Rodriguez came up big time, blasting a towering, game-tying two-run homer into the Boston bullpen off Jonathan Papelbon.

 

That…was a BOMB!

 

When he smacked that homer, two things came to my mind:

 

A) June 3, 2007. Rodriguez homered off Papelbon at Fenway Park that night and the Yankees went on to beat Boston. On his way back to the dugout, Rodriguez playfully placed his hand over the ESPN camera.

 

That’s A-Rod for you. Just as you saw him acting like a little leaguer when the team waited for Thames at home plate, he showed everyone the five year-old in him.

 

B) 2009 Postseason.

 

How many games did the Yankees win last October, simply because Rodriguez was there?

 

 


A-Rod is clutch. Accept it. 

A lot!

 

He had game-tying homer after game-tying homer all throughout the playoffs. Better yet, all of his game-tiers came in the seventh inning or later.

 

In his own words, “To say I’m not clutch is ridiculous.”

 

He answered all his critics with his performance last postseason. But if you ask me, I say he proved everyone wrong in 2007. He put the team on his back the whole year and just like tonight, they would have gone nowhere without him.

 

Chalk up another clutch hit from A-Rod.

 

Yankee Pitching

 

 


Phil Hughes tossed five innings tonight 

The 5-0 Phil Hughes made the start for the Yankees tonight. He tossed five innings and gave up five earned runs on six hits. He walked one batter and struck out three.

 

Not his best game.

 

It’s pretty impressive when I can say Hughes did not pitch his best game, yet he was in line for a win when he left. The Red Sox really just wore him out, put good at-bats together, and made him throw a lot of pitches.

 

No decision for Hughes tonight, but his ERA did climb up to 2.25. All things considered, it’s a pretty good number. I still think he has the ability to make a Cy Young Award push if he keeps pitching the way he is.

 

So overall, a below average start from Hughes, but it was not bad.

 

The Yankee bullpen however…meh.

 

When the offense scores six runs over the first two innings, there really is no excuse to be blowing the game. Now a good part of that you can pin on Hughes’s shoulders, but he maintained the lead. The bullpen’s job is to hold the lead, even in a tight game.

 

Lately that’s been a serious problem. Case in point: yesterday vs. the Twins.

 

Tonight the ‘pen combined for four innings and gave up four runs on seven hits. They walked one batters and collectively struck out three.

 

Boone Logan recorded a hold despite giving up a home run to Victor Martinez. Simply put, I do not trust him. When he comes into a game, I hold my breath. Logan has velocity, but his control is becoming an issue.

 

Then there’s Chan Ho Park. I hope he has less diarrhea now.

 

 


Chan Ho Park has not been doing the job this season 

On his first day back from the disabled list, he blew a save and gave up back-to-back home runs. It was his second blown save of the year and ironically enough, his first one came against…the Red Sox, back on Opening Night.

 

Park was charged with three earned runs on four hits. After the game, manager Joe Girardi said he was the only guy available for the eighth, since Joba Chamberlain and David Robertson pitched yesterday.

 

So far, Park is making it hard for me to say anything nice about him.

 

Damaso Marte tossed a scoreless 1 1/3 innings, working around a walk and a hit.

 

Finally Girardi was forced to go to Javier Vazquez, who is actually starting Friday night vs. the Mets at Citi Field. With runners on the corners and two outs, Vazquez did probably the best thing he has done all year–got out of the inning and kept the game where it was.

 

 


Javy Vazquez got the win tonight 

Vazquez needed just four pitches to get it done, meaning he is still available to make the start Friday. He really had the best night out of all the pitchers and for his performance, he was rewarded the win.

 

Although his ERA is a bloated 8.01, Vazquez now has a 2-4 season record.

 

It will be interesting to see how he does Friday night. As it has been documented, he has had success in the National League. Well, his expertise from the other league will be put to the test: Yanks are in an NL ballpark and he is facing an NL team.

 

We’ll see how he does. As for tonight, he can relax. Job well done.

 

However, it’s no secret the Yanks’ bullpen is rattled. There needs to be more consistency among the relievers if the Yankees are going to succeed. I think I put it best when Hughes left after the fifth:

 

“Tonight would have been a great night for Alfredo Aceves.”

 

It’s too bad he’s (one of the many Yankees) bitten by the injury bug.  

 

 

Great win for the Yanks; the best of the year if you ask me. Tampa Bay won their game tonight, so we remain two games out of first place. The Red Sox however, are 8 ½ games behind. That’s bad news for them.

 

Tomorrow night CC Sabathia (4-2, 3.71 ERA) vs. Josh Beckett (1-1. 7.46 ERA).

 

Might have the makings of another classic.

 

Go Yankees!!!   

Yankees vs. Red Sox: Thoughts and Notes

Another day, another squadoosh.

 

In convincing fashion, the New York Yankees once again beat down the Boston Red Sox, winning big time on Saturday afternoon by a score of 14-3.

 

There were a lot of stories from this one…

 

Mark Teixeira

 

 


Mark Teixeira hit 3 homers today 

The Yankee calendar on my wall is in May and (no lie) the Yankee who is represented by the picture for the month is Mark Teixeira. Historically this has been his month, so I guess it’s no coincidence that he is the Yankee pictured on the calendar for the month of May.

 

The Yankees’ first baseman had a forgettable April, but in May he has been raking, even if it’s only been a week. Today he was 4-for-6 at the dish with three (yes, three) home runs and five RBIs. He scored four runs and became the first Yankee since Lou Gehrig (who accomplished the feat on June 23, 1927) to hit three homers in one game against the Red Sox.

 

That’s great company, Tex.

 

His first homer broke a 3-3 tie in the top of the fifth and gave the Yankees a 4-3 lead. From there the Bombers never looked back, tacking on two more runs in the inning before the skies opened up and rain caused an hour and 24 minute delay.

 

After the rain cleared and the game resumed, Teixeira once again flexed his muscles in the seventh inning. He wrapped another solo homer around the “Pesky Pole” in right field for one of two runs the Yanks scored in the frame.

 

At last, in the top of the ninth, he creamed a pitch off Jonathan Van Every (yes, the Red Sox bullpen was so bad they needed to use outfielders as pitchers). Teixeira’s two-run bomb went so far, it bounced off the light pole above the Green Monster in left field. It marked his third round-tripper of the day and his fifth homer of the year.

 

Talk about a career day at the plate.  

 

One great day offensively and everything turned around. Teixeira finally “got off the interstate,” if you will, raising his batting average up to .207. His home run count climbed and he is up to 20 RBIs on the year.

 

Teixeira really has it going right now, as he already has more hits and home runs than he did last month. He may be a slow starter, but when he gets going he turns into a monster. It’s almost as if Teixeira was a sleeping bull dog and the Red Sox threw rocks at him today.

 

 


Tex was a sleeping bull dog...Boston woke him up 

Boston woke the sleeping bull dog and he relentlessly attacked them.

 

I have a feeling this is just the first dose of what’s to come from the Yankee first baseman. He seems to be seeing the ball a lot better and he hit to all fields today. If we see Teixeira in this form, the Yankee offense is going to be in great shape despite the injury problems they are currently undergoing.

 

Francisco Cervelli

 

 


Francisco Cervelli knocked in five of the Yanks' 14 runs 

I am currently lobbying to find out whether or not Francisco Cervelli is human.

 

“The Cisco Kid” had a wonderful game last night and the beat continued this afternoon. Coming off his three RBI night last night, the backup catcher went 3-for-4 with five RBIs and a walk. He is currently hitting .429 in Jorge Posada’s absence and is proving that belongs in the big leagues.

 

A few years ago when Elliot Johnson ran him over at home plate and broke his wrist in Spring Training, I seriously doubted he would ever make it to the big leagues. But the Yankees kind of rewarded him and brought him up, thus giving him the opportunity to show us what he is made of.

 

And right now, he is showing us that he is made of steel.

 

The Yanks could not have asked for anything more. With Posada out, Cervelli could not be performing any better. I believe any team would sign up for a backup catcher who has the type of numbers Cervelli is currently posting.

 

Today he became the first Yankee catcher to record five RBIs in a game against Boston since Yogi Berra in 1957. Cervelli’s hitting is just speaking for itself.

 

Not to mention his defense and ability to call a good game.

 

The relationship between a catcher and a pitcher is oftentimes overlooked. If the two do not have a good rapport, there is no way they are going to have any success. It’s common sense. If you do not get along with someone, and you are both working toward the same goal, you are probably not going to reach that goal.

 

Cervelli just has the ability to work nicely with every pitcher on the Yankee staff. It doesn’t matter if it is CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett or anyone. He works wonders with each pitcher.

 

Consider this: every Yankee starter is doing so well. Cervelli has been catching the majority of those games that each pitcher has been winning.

 

That pretty much tells me he is doing a wonderful job.

 

I can safely say that Cervelli is a lot of fun to watch. He has a great attitude, plays the game the right way, and that big old helmet always make me laugh. He can hit, he can field his position, and he is a nice, home-grown Yankee.

 

I’ll just say it: Cervelli is my favorite Baby Bomber.

 

Other Notes:

 

 


Yankee notes! 

–CC Sabathia tossed 4 2/3 innings today. He would have gone much deeper into the ballgame if the rain delay did not slow him down. It’s unfortunate that they called for the tarp when he needed one strike to qualify for the win.

 

I don’t think it was fair; they should have let him just get that out and then roll out the tarp.   

 

If Sabathia has 19 wins at the end of the year…he’ll be thinking about today.

 

–Nick Johnson is going to be out for awhile, as he injured his wrist last night. Why am I not surprised? We knew the day we signed him that this would happen. Should have just paid Matsui, Cashman…

 

–Dustin Pedroia was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the third. YES, it was intentional and quite honestly, Boston deserved it. Josh Beckett could have seriously caused some problems in hitting Robinson Cano last night.

 

You hit our second baseman, we hit yours.

 

Only problem was that after the HBP, Victor Martinez smacked a two-run homer to give Boston a 3-2 lead. In the long run it didn’t matter, because the Yankees offense exploded and eventually won big, but if the Yankees somehow did not come back and win, they would have second guessed that decision for the rest of the night.

 

–Nick Swisher had three more RBIs and two more hits today. As I said yesterday: en fuego! Swisher is having such a great year. It’s great to see him succeeding and this could really be his breakout year.

 

He has already won our hearts and he is just making us love him more.

 

–Randy Winn made some base-running mistakes today. He got nailed at home plate and got caught up in a rundown to kill a rally. He has done some good things to help the Yankees win this week, so I’ll lay off him for now.

 

–Alex Rodriguez had an RBI today, two hits, and three runs scored. His average is now up to .276, but he is still stuck on two homers for the year.

 

I’m not really worried about him right now. The Yanks are winning and as we saw with Teixeira today: it only takes a few at-bats to turn everything around. I’m sure Rodriguez will ignite and start launching some A-Bombs.

 

I can’t wait to see him get his 600th homer. Whenever it comes, I’m sure it’ll be a very proud moment for him and his team.

 

A-Rod is currently 15 homers away from the milestone.

 

–A.J. Burnett (4-0, 1.99 ERA) is starting for the Yanks tomorrow night against Jon Lester (2-2, 3.93 ERA). Yanks will be looking for a sweep.

 

–The Yankees have now won nine of their first 10 series this season. That is unbelievably impressive. They also extended their win streak to six games.

 

 

YES Network Shout-out

 

 


The Yes Network used my comment on TV! 

After the game, the YES Network hosts their Extra Innings post game show. I heard Bob Lorenz mention that if you have Facebook or Twitter you can submit a comment and they might use it on TV, if they like it.

 

Watching the game and on my laptop, I went to YES’ Facebook page and posted a comment about Adrian Beltre. During today’s telecast, it was mentioned that he has committed seven errors this year.

 

If you ask me, seven errors on May 8 is a lot!

 

Watching the post game show, I was shocked to hear Jack Curry and Bob Lorenz mention my name on TV and show my comment!!!

 

They also brought it up to fellow MLBlogger Kim Jones, and she offered her insight after they talked about mine. It felt really good, and I had to text everyone I knew and tell them I was featured on the YES Network; featured after a Yankee beat-down of the Red Sox, no less.

 

This isn’t the first time I have been featured on TV, either.

 

 


My insight has also been featured on ESPN's baseball show 

Back in 2008 and last year in 2009, I was featured on ESPN Baseball Tonight’s “Chatter Up” segment. It was the same principle on ESPN; you submit your comment at home and if they like it, they use it.

 

I had to write about it in this blog. I can never contain my excitement whenever I’m on TV. (That’s why I had to take the picture of my name on TV!)

 

I just wanted to say: THANK YOU YES NETWORK for using my comment!!!!!!!

 

You guys rock!

Rookie of the Year: It’s Not a Joke!

Today MLB announced the American League and National League Rookie of the Year Award winners.

 

Rookie of the Year 

 

Andrew Bailey, the Oakland Athletics’ 25 year-old right-handed reliever out of Wagner College, received AL honors while Chris Coghlan, a 24 year-old left fielder for the Marlins from Palm Harbor, Florida won the  NL award.  

 

The Rookie of the Year Award is very important, if you ask me. But I was watching ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption show this evening and they didn’t even make mention of the winners until the very end of the program.

 

In fact, it was almost as if they announced the winners in passing and the hosts of the show had never even heard of Bailey and Coghlan; they didn’t even know which teams each winner plays for!

 

 


These two knuckleheads had no clue who the ROY winners were 

I’m sorry, but that is ridiculous. Tony Kornheiser guessed that Coghlan was on the Padres while Michael Wilbon suggested Bailey was on the Royals.

 

I just find that sad; if I were one of these two young men, I would be very upset. Every young player loves watching themselves on ESPN and to think if either Bailey or Coghlan turned on Pardon the Interruption tonight….neither host even knew who they were.

 

Coghlan had a respectable season, making his MLB debut on May 8. He set a new franchise record for consecutive, multiple-hit games; Coghlan hit more than once in a game eight straight times this year.

 

 


Florida's Chris Coghlan won NL Rookie of the Year 

At the conclusion of the season, Coghlan finished with a .321 average (which led all rookies) nine home runs and 47 RBIs.

 

That’s impressive, wouldn’t you say? I’d say that is enough to be called Rookie of the Year.

 

Bailey also posted stellar numbers this season, nailing down 26 saves for the Athletics this year. He went 6-3 with a 1.84 ERA coupled with 91 strikeouts in 81 1/3 innings pitched. He also was selected to the All-Star Game this year and got to participate with the game’s best players in St. Louis this past summer.

 

 


Oakland's Andrew Bailey won AL Rookie of the Year 

Like Coghlan, Bailey was impressive. He earned it.

 

But I just find it unfortunate that there are people who had no idea who these kids are and almost made the whole thing into a joke; I mean Kornheiser and Wilbon guessing which teams these players are on?

 

Give me a break.

 

Jackie Robinson was the first ever Rookie of the Year in 1947, as the honor was the brainchild of the Chicago chapter of the Baseball Writer’s Association. For the first two years of its existence, the award was given to one player but in 1949 one player from each league was given the title.

 

Along with Robinson, a number of other influential and famous players have been the given Rookie of the Year Award. I’m talking Cal Ripken, Jr., Eddie Murray, Carlton Fisk, Rod Carew, Luis Aparcio…

 

And even our very own Derek Jeter. (Incidentally Jeter is the last Yankee player to win the award)

 

Jeter was so humble when he won the award in 1996; I remember him saying something like, “I think I had some help with the voting.” The Yankee Captain had won the award unanimously, hitting 10 homers and averaging .314 with 78 runs and 183 hits.

 

Derek Jeter won ROY in 1996 

 

He beat out James Baldwin of the Chicago White Sox, 104 points to 64.

 

But what if Jeter had won the award and nobody knew who he was or even what team he was on? Or TV hosts basically joked about the fact that they had no idea where he came from?

 

I just found that to be in bad taste. I normally think the banter and humor on Pardon the Interruption is funny, but tonight I was not really laughing. I was actually quite upset.

 

But it’s alright–Andrew and Chris are taking home the hardware, not ESPN. So even though they may have been slighted a little bit, they still get the last laugh.

 

Congrats to both Bailey and Coghlan. You guys have earned it. Tomorrow MLB will announce the Cy Young Award winners.

 

Will CC Sabathia be Cy Cy Sabathia?  Or Will Zack Greinke take it home to Kansas City? Tune in tomorrow. Same (baseball) bat time, same channel.